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  1. Pingback: Norman Haga

    1. Benny Goodman

      Hi Norman, i think i see you are from the US…medicalisation is costing you guys billions of dollars and making some shareholders in particular companies very rich indeed. Dont get me wrong we need medicinec, but we might consider solving social and political illls using social and poltical methods. Only if we can’t and if we are suffering real pain should we reach for pill bottle.

  2. Pingback: Haga information

  3. Pingback: An unachievable utopia in nursing practice? Utopia will not be paid for by the ‘Greedy Bastards’ | Benny Goodman, Blogger

  4. Pingback: The NMC and 3 yearly revalidation. | Benny Goodman, Blogger

  5. carol dimon

    well said. There are multiple factors involved in the delivery of care and poor care does not solely exist in the NHS. There is evidence of poor care throughout history in all countries. Revalidation by the method proposed by the NMC is a means of silencing whistleblowing and supporting the business objectives of the employer.there is no quick fix. Who are these people who propose such things? see hook “The commodity of care”.

  6. Keith

    Hi Benny I am a staff nurse, doing a palliative care course and my first assignment is about medicalisation.

    I like your definition and wonder if I could use it help me construct a good definition of my own as the elements are good. I was thinking I might come the power and control angle.

    1. Benny Goodman

      Hi Keith, thank you for commenting. Indeed you may use this. You can see the references I used to contruct the paper as well. Power and control issues as part of medicalisation and are of course crucial to why we allow medical control and also seek medical control. The theorist who discussed this was of course Foucault who discussed the concept of the medical ‘gaze’in his book ‘The birth of the clinic’An archeology of medical perception (1963). Here Focault seeks to describe how medical practice through its ‘gaze’ in the emerging clinics/teaching hopsitals had a tendency to seperate the human body from personal identity. This was linked to a growing power/scientific discourse linked to medical professionals’ legal ability to dissect, examine, classify the body biomedically. To bring this up to date, just last week I had student nurses telling me that they have experienced the dehumanising ‘medical gaze’ first hand in both the treatment of patients and of themselves. One described herself as being treated like a piece of meat. So yes, power and control can still be central to medical practice for some doctors (and nurses!). So, medicalisation can result in the exercise of power and the way bodies are classified and human beings treated.

  7. Sung

    That was an excellent analysis.

    I wish you would change the colors though. It’s extremely hard to read. I had to paste the text in my text editor to read.

    Never use light text on light backgrounds or dark text on dark backgrounds. There needs to be a contrast for easy reading.

    Other than that, good job.

  8. Pingback: Case Study | Pearltrees

    1. Benny Goodman

      thanks you for the comment but I se that the website sells essays and is thus a commercial enterprise? I welcome debate rather than hosting commerce.

  9. Christopher Porter

    An excellent article.

    I think the well thought through reasoning and rational behind the script can have few in the profession, that work at the bedside, dare to challenge it as being incorrect.

    The problem for those who wish to teach good practice, in fact best practice, is that they are often mocked by those that deliver the care, for being unrealistic in their promotion of a level of service ‘that costs’, in this age of austerity, cost cutting, and the never-ending demand to meet ‘shifting (often monthly) financial targets.

    It becomes understandable when new nurses begin to feel disillusioned with, not only the minimal level of care that they are able to deliver, but with the promotors of an ‘old school ideology’ that they are meant to apply to each and every patient, but are increasingly finding it impossible to do in this cash strapped profession.

    The media portrays a profession that has forgotten how to be professional, but fail to see that most in the various branches of ‘care’ truly want to do just that – care. But care costs money.

    Politicians can churn out ‘sound bits’ of concern, but do not back this up with the necessary finance to turn ‘concern’ into ‘resolution’. They will only do something dramatic about it if they feel that by not doing something will show them in a poor light.

    But scrape away the very thin veneer of political spin regarding how much better off the NHS is ‘in real terms’ we see that ‘in real terms’ the requirements of the needy population (the elderly, those affected with handicaps that require professional input, for the vulnerable children and families that increasingly make up an ever growing problem in society – that if not addressed causes an increased demand on the health profession) are not being properly met because the government is not sufficiently concerned to do what is needed to resolve these issues.

    To have a caring NHS, that a new student nurse can be proud to work for, requires a lot more finance, not less. The government, the public, have to be willing to reach deep into their ‘pockets’ and pay for the sort of service that we wish to receive when we have need to use the service – and we will all have need of this service!

    It is time to pay the price.

  10. namaya

    You are illegally using this art of mine. This is Ecocide. That is under my copy right.

    If my name is at the bottom of it with copyright, and places to purchase it, then you can use it for a limited use.

    Otherwise this is illegal

    please contact us

    namaya

  11. Pingback: Caregiving | A Better NHS

  12. Pingback: General practice adaption | A Better NHS

  13. Linda East

    What a fantastic blog post, Benny. It’s good to be reminded that something as simple as not buying bottled water is important, when the whole agenda seems so overwhelming. The point about addressing grief and loss is also really interesting, and maybe something we nurses should be exploring further.

  14. Louise Johns

    Brilliant, you could challenge Bill Bryan as a travel writer with wit and humour. I want to go there now. Loved this article, thank you for lightening core concepts!

  15. Alyssa Motts

    Hello,

    My name is Alyssa. I’m a freelancer who works in Promo-Logic, an online media agency.

    Would you be interested in writing an article that is relevant to your readers, with a link to one of my clients, for a fixed fee that we would pay you? If you are interested, please let me know and I’ll provide you with more details.

    Also, if you own other sites, please send me their URLs, so I can review them.

    I look forward to hearing from you!
    Sincerely,

    Alyssa Motts
    Media Account Manager

    Promo Logic Media Service

    alyssa.motts@gmail.com

    http://www.promo-logic.net

    1. Benny Goodman

      Hi esther,

      The answer to that rests on what you think nurse education is for. If you think it is about learning skills for clinical practice then studying social science may seem like a distraction. However, social studies uncover a wealth of knowledge and critical ideas. It challenges our values and assumptions about the world. Any nurse interested in health and well being would find much to interest one’s mind. The ideas in this blog are example of that.

  16. Sam Charlton

    As a first year on a pre reg MSc adult nursing course. I’ve found many of our discussions political and sociological. Natural allies to healthcare and ultimately nursing. This enthusiasm for political debate in a postgraduate arena is not followed when you visit the BSc cohorts.

    A read of this manifesto could be one of the many things that could try to change the attitude of apathy, with borderline ignorance.

    keep up the good work

    1. Benny Goodman

      Thank you Sam, i have a more acadeic piece for a nursing journal, and there are sevarl profs of nursing interested. I have an acyion nursing twitter account @actionnursing. thank you for the supportive comments.

  17. John Clayton

    ‘Unmasking your inadequacy only takes the slightest breeze of truth to waft in your direction exposing you to the hurricane of derision that greets a three inch penis at a porn festival’. Herculian, my friend.

  18. Marionlynch

    Perfect
    Thank you
    Everything I needed clarifying in one place with intelligence and passion

  19. Patricia Patterson

    I stumbled upon your postings when I was searching for some detail about our accommodation in Mijas Pueblo in September and to my absolute surprise and delight we will be staying in the same little studio – hosts Henri and Marian- and now thanks to your detailed, funny, and interesting postings we simply can’t wait to be there. Fully intend to have the afore mentioned prawn dish for lunch and watch the sunrise from our bed each morning !! We know Mijas Pueblo well having stayed for about eight consecutive years at the other end of the village near the little Church so we can so much relate to all the places , characters, the donkeys, the market, the food that you so eloquently write about in your articles. Thank you, Patricia & Calvin

  20. Patricia Patterson

    Hello, Yes we had a wonderful stay . Found the spiral stairs quite daunting but soon got the hang of it – not bad for two
    Travellers of a similar age as Henri ! ! If you do visit again please tell the story, we really enjoy your blogs !
    This is quite a coincidence but our Grandaughter, Samantha Patterson,is a Second Year Student Nurse at Plymouth University ! It’s a small world ! Cheers, Patricia

    1. Benny Goodman

      1) It provides an alternative to individualistic biomedical models. For example: A sociology of midwifery would point to the medicalisation of pregnancy and childbirth and consider what has been lost and gained by the take over by mostly male medical practitioners. A sociology of pregnancy would point to issues such as body image and ‘fat phobia’. Biomedicine focuses the midwife on the A and P of pregnancy and medical interventions/risk assessments. This is not an either or position for sociology/biomedicine.

      2) Supports critical and self reflective practice. Because social theory asks one to consider one’ values, beliefs and attitudes and how that might be shaped by certain social structures (e.g. medical/midwifery/nursing hierarchies) it asks us to think about our thinking.

      3) Addresses exercise of power. Consider the hospital managerial context and the notion of parallel but disconnected professional hierarchies. Consider the nature of the midwife-woman/family/father relationship: who has the power to define the situation for example?

      4) Encourages a ‘quality of mind’ (Mills 1959). This quality of mind is critical and questioning and tries to link individual experiences with changes in wider society. This asks midwives to consider much wider social structures and the experiences of pregnancy and birth, for example why the drift to hospital births, why do certain women prefer home births and how does midwifery practice help or hinder such decisions? What about the availability of drugs/affects of family size/political police on child care and support?….

      5) Challenges the ‘taken for granted’. List what you take for granted in practice as ‘normal’ ‘natural’ and ‘right’ and critique it. Why are delivery suites et up the way they are…is this normality always ‘natural and right…could we be different in our support for women?

      6) Involves the ‘know why’ not just the ‘know how’. all of the above gives you why answers or at least asks you to ask why.

    1. Benny Goodman

      1) It provides an alternative to individualistic biomedical models. For example: A sociology of midwifery would point to the medicalisation of pregnancy and childbirth and consider what has been lost and gained by the take over by mostly male medical practitioners. A sociology of pregnancy would point to issues such as body image and ‘fat phobia’. Biomedicine focuses the midwife on the A and P of pregnancy and medical interventions/risk assessments. This is not an either or position for sociology/biomedicine.

      2) Supports critical and self reflective practice. Because social theory asks one to consider one’ values, beliefs and attitudes and how that might be shaped by certain social structures (e.g. medical/midwifery/nursing hierarchies) it asks us to think about our thinking.

      3) Addresses exercise of power. Consider the hospital managerial context and the notion of parallel but disconnected professional hierarchies. Consider the nature of the midwife-woman/family/father relationship: who has the power to define the situation for example?

      4) Encourages a ‘quality of mind’ (Mills 1959). This quality of mind is critical and questioning and tries to link individual experiences with changes in wider society. This asks midwives to consider much wider social structures and the experiences of pregnancy and birth, for example why the drift to hospital births, why do certain women prefer home births and how does midwifery practice help or hinder such decisions? What about the availability of drugs/affects of family size/political police on child care and support?….

      5) Challenges the ‘taken for granted’. List what you take for granted in practice as ‘normal’ ‘natural’ and ‘right’ and critique it. Why are delivery suites et up the way they are…is this normality always ‘natural and right…could we be different in our support for women?

      6) Involves the ‘know why’ not just the ‘know how’. all of the above gives you why answers or at least asks you to ask why.

      just one example:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9566.00290/abstract

    1. Benny Goodman

      Many thanks for pointing that out and I have put that link into the blog. My use of the metaphor was to suggest that back in 2015 and before, Trump was a Black Swan with less than a 50/50 chance, as he was not even the GOP’s nomination until July 2016. I’m not sure what odds one would get for a bet on Trump back in 2015? According to Fortune “The odds of a Trump win closed from around 25 to 1 in August 2015 when he first announced his campaign”. Now I’ll bow to Taleb every time, but 25:1 seems highly improbable. In 2014, what were the odds then. Nonexistent, because he has not even a candidate. So, from the perspective of 2014 Trump was massive black swan?

  21. mazza

    Amazing description of the barton and grant model, will definitely help me with my assignment

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