Care quality in the NHS

.”‘When…only one man is unemployed, that is his personal trouble, and for its relief we look to the character of the man, his skills and his immediate opportunities. When…15 million…are unemployed, that is an issue, and we may not hope to find the solution within the range of opportunities open to any one individual. The very structure of opportunities has collapsed. Both the correct statement of the problem and the range of possible solutions require us to consider the economic and political institutions of society and not merely the personal situation and character of a scatter of individuals’. (p9). (C Wright Mills – The Sociological Imagination).

….today we hear about the safeguarding tragedy that was Daniel Pelka. Again, communication issues between agencies and the failure to act have been highlighted. His parents are in jail. If only one social worker failed then we should look to the character of that social worker. When we have a historical record of failures which all highlight communication issues and failures to act, we will not find solutions only in the failings of individuals, the socio-cultural systems itself fails. The correct statement of the problem and the the range of possible solutions require us to consider the economic, social, cultural and political institutions of society.

….we have heard about the care failings that was Mid Staffs. Again, neglect and abuse of frail elderly patients were highlighted. If only one healthcare professional or manager failed, then we should look to the character of that professional. When we have a historical record of failures which all highlight neglect and abuse, we will not find solutions only in the failings of individuals, the socio-cultural system itself fails. The correct statement of the problem and the the range of possible solutions require us to consider the economic, social, cultural and political institutions of society and not just the striking off professionals from registers.

Sir Brian Jarman stated in a recent Lancet article:

“To improve the quality of care in UK hospitals, I would reintroduce the Independent Review Panels and Community Health Councils and develop monthly complaints alerts similar to the mortality alerts. Regulation would be more independent if the CQC reported in public to Parliament, and there would be better communication if it were integrated with Monitor. Additionally, it is important to ensure  there are minimum staff-to-patient levels of doctors and nurses, with 65% trained nurses and  regulation of health-care assistants (my emphasis). I would aim for

total physicians per head of population at the EU average. Ideally I would also like to see training  introduced for the boards of trusts and for them to
have equal representation of patients, clinicians,  finance, and managers. There has been a decade  of concerns about the quality of care in our
hospitals: patients have been ignored, the  regulatory systems have failed, and there has been a culture of denial”.Instead we get the mess that is the Health and Social Act which is supposedly a ‘reform‘, and the NMC engaging in ‘re-validation’.

When will we learn that inspection and revalidation are external post hoc care quality issues, there is of course a place for these processes but there is a need to ensure the quality of care is structurally built into care delivery systems – and that means ensuring that you have enough staff, enough of the right sort of staff, educate and support them and engage in continuing professional development, appraisal and performance management if necessary.

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